Tergooi

Hilversum, the Netherlands

A hospital
in harmony

Tergooi Hilversum and Blaricum bring together all kinds of care in one beautiful, wooded location: the De Monnikenberg care park. On the same ground that Tergooi Hilversum has stood on since the 1950s, a new, state-of-the-art regional hospital with 525 beds is currently being built. Once the new facility is complete, Tergooi Blaricum can eventually be closed down.

Following extensive analysis and research in the possibility of reusing the existing structures, it was concluded that a new building would, in fact, be smarter and more economical than an intensive renovation of the two existing buildings, which had grown together over time.

 

Three buildings, one whole

Hidden in the trees are three seemingly separate, higher sections of the building, where the hospital’s primary functions are located: outpatient clinics, the emergency room, the general practitioner’s office, diagnostics, treatment, ICU and the nursing wards. But on the ground floor and the first floor, the hospital feels like one continuous whole, and the various building sections are organically connected by wide, light, transparent corridors.

Of the original buildings, only the old V-wing remains. After reconstruction is complete, this wing will provide space for offices and utilities. The facades of this wing had been renovated fairly recently, and with some minor modifications, the building is still highly functional.

Peace and direction

For patients and visitors in the central hall, the passage gives a sense of direction. It runs like a spine through the entire complex. At the transition from one part of the building to the other, you pass through conservatory-like corridors that give you the feeling of stepping outside, among the trees. Each section also has a large patio, which ensures ample light and connection with the outside world.

In the same way, the radiology and the outpatient clinics on the ground floor are easily accessible as well. As a visitor, you only have to turn once, and you are where you need to be. This provides a sense of orientation and tranquillity. In the nursing wards, each patient has their own room, offering maximum privacy. Thanks to the low windowsills and high windows, there is always a view of the world below and of the trees and the sky.

Connected to the heart

On the second floor, staff can easily move patients throughout the building in their hospital bed. This ensures that this kind of traffic is separate from the public traffic on the ground floor.

At the heart of the complex is the hot floor, with radiology on the ground floor and the OR department on the first floor. Due to its central location, the OR is effectively linked to care processes on all sides. This also provides tranquillity and a view, both for the patients and the care professionals.

Sustainable harmony

The facades are inspired by the forest. The vertical rhythm, the bark-like vertical brickwork, the glossy aluminium that looks like leaves and the contrasts between light and dark all harmonize with the surroundings and subtly reflect the surrounding forest.

The green Sedum roofs reduce heat in summer and contribute to overall sustainability. The roofs are also equipped with solar panels that provide a large portion of the building’s energy.

“A hospital, despite its scale and complex functional requirements, must be a home in which people with all their needs can come into their own. That’s what we achieved at Tergooi.”

Jörn-Ole Stellmann
Partner/Architect

“A hospital, despite its scale and complex functional requirements, must be a home in which people with all their needs can come into their own. That’s what we achieved at Tergooi.”

Project data

Location
Hilversum, the Netherlands
Functie
New construction of general hospital
Size
66,315 m² GFA (New construction: 60,355 m² GFA; Renovation: 5,960 m² GFA)
Period
2011 – 2023
Status
In construction
Client
Tergooi
User
Tergooi
Team
Jörn-Ole Stellmann, Jarno Nillesen, Bert Muijres, Jasper Vrugte, Gert van Rijssen, Mark Kreijkes, Milee Herweijer, Stephanie Klein Holkenborg, Abel Brouwer, Martijn van de Berg, Taecke Halma, Arend van Maanen, Heleen Meinsma, Menno Roefs, Kirsten van Zeijl, Joris Alofs, Roel van Brussel, Eric Pijffers, Maurice van Dinther, Pauline Rozenbaum
In collaboration with
ptg advies, Royal HaskoningDHV, Deerns, SVP